Feb 26, 2006

While yr at it, check out Tool a Magazine #6, featuring Frank Sherlock, Joyelle McSweeney, Brenda Iijima, Susan Schultz, & yours truly.

Feb 25, 2006

Feb 22, 2006

Still Time To Board My Spaceship




There is still time left to submit to the first Cy Gist press chapbook, My Spaceship. Cy Gist Press will focus on chapbooks of ekphrastic poetry (that is, poems which describe/ interact with/ stem from works of visual art.) At this stage, the press will be focusing primarily on obscure texts in proprietary limbo. (In this instance, a black-and-white coloring book I had when I was a kid.) Submitted poems need not directly address or describe the images themselves--simply think of them as a point of origin. If you want to alter the images themselves with text, feel free to do this as well. Keep in mind, however, that the chapbook will be black-and-white only.


The images may be found here. If you require a higher-resolution image for manipulation, just let me know which image you are interested in. There are 20 images total, and each one will appear in the text only once. In the instance where there are numerous entries for a single image, I will select the one I like the best. You may submit as many poems as you like (submitting poems for multiple images will obviously increase the chance that I'll take one). Send submissions as MS Word documents or PDFs to: mark_lamoureux@yahoo.com. (Don't worry about cover-letters, etc. unless you feel the need). Please be sure to indicate which image each poem is intended to accompany. The reading period is from the time of this announcement to March 1, with the chapbook being completed in the following month or two. Payment will be 3 author's copies. Submitters will be notified at the end of the reading period. If I haven't received poems for every image I may write you back and solicit something for a different image.


Cy Gist press titles will not be sold, rather they are intended for barter for other works, for materials for future publications, or whatever else you may want to send to the editor in order to obtain a copy. Contributors will receive their 3 copies free of "charge"-additional copies can be bartered for. In the unlikely event that someone submits work and I don't take anything, I will send you a copy of the chapbook anyway. For the purpose of barter, things I'll be needing are:


Heavy bond white paper (30# or heavier) (I am going to be using legal sized for (11x14 for My Spaceship)
Cover stock
Binding thread
Access to an industrial-strength paper-cutter
Labor (come over some time and sew some books, etc.)
Booze (unless you want to send some in the mail, I recommend seeking out the editor and buying him a drink of your choice...)


Of course, I am open to whatever else it is you might want to send me (legal items only, please).


Materials received will help shape future projects. The cost of a chapbook would be roughly $5 or so, so the number of copies a given donation incurs will be based more or less on that figure. If you really can't think of anything, just donate $5 to the press and I'll send you a chapbook.
All snailmail correspondence to:


Mark Lamoureux
25-16 41st. St. Apt. 2f
Astoria, NY 11103

Feb 20, 2006

The Animals I've Trapped Have All Become My Pets



Born 2/20

1726
William Prescott
soldier: American Revolutionary War d: 1795

1829
Joseph Jefferson
actor d: 1905

1902
Ansel Adams
photographer d: 1984

1904
Aleksei [Nikolevich] Kosygin
Soviet premier d: 1980

1910
Carl Stotz
Father of Little League d: 1992

1914
John Daly
Emmy Award-winning reporter, TV host d: 1991

1915
Chick [Melvin] Harbert
golf

1924
Gloria Vanderbilt
fashion designer

1925
Robert Altman
director

1926
Bob Richards
Olympic Gold Medalist pole-vaulter

1927
Sidney Poitier
Academy Award-winning actor

1928
Roy [Elroy Leon] Face
baseball

1929
Amanda Blake [Beverly Neill]
actress d: 1989

1930
Patricia Smith
actress

1934
Bobby [Robert William] Unser
race car driver, Indianapolis 500 winner

1937
Roger Penske
race car driver

1937
Nancy Wilson
singer

1941
Buffy [Beverly] Sainte-Marie
singer, songwriter

1941
Clyde Wright
baseball

1942
Phil [Philip Anthony] Esposito
hockey

1942
Mitch McConnell
U.S. Senator

1946
Sandy Duncan
dancer, actress

1946
J. [Jerome] Geils
guitarist

1946
Brenda Blethyn
actress

1947
Peter Strauss
actor

1948
Pierre Bouchard
hockey

1949
Jennifer O'Neill
actress

1950
Walter Becker
musician, bassist

1951
Edward Albert
actor

1951
Randy California [Wolfe]
singer, musician

1954
Patty Hearst [Shaw]
publishing heiress, actress

1958
James Wilby
actor

1963
Charles Barkley
basketball

1963
Ian Brown
singer

1963
Ron Eldard
actor

1964
French Stewart
actor

1966
Cindy Crawford
supermodel

1967
Kurt [Donald] Cobain
musician, singer d: 1994

1967
Andrew Shue
actor

1967
Lili Taylor
actress

Feb 17, 2006

I am excited about The Fairy Tale Review. As evinced by my own editorial endeavors, I am a fan of the "concept" project. I think coming at the editorial process through an arbitrary lens helps to lift one out of subconscious biases and prejudices. E.g. in the example of FTR we see work by "mainstream" types like Addonizio and also the likes of Sara Veglahn (who is one of my personal favorite poets--not that being liked by me makes one non-"mainstream," but you get my drift.) By contextualizing the work, one can look at the individual offerings and delve deeper into the ways in which they achieve their various ends, which is a nice, active reading process. Which is not to say that there isn't a need for the cadre-journals (after all one ultimately wants to be among friends) but it is good to mill friendly-like in the public square with one's "peers" at times, and I think journals like this one are a good place for that to happen.

Feb 14, 2006

Happy Louis Zukofsky day!

4.
VALENTINE

This
is
not
more
snow
to
fall

but
a
gust
of
the
softest--
bending

down
the
wood
of
gardens'
branches
into

a
girls
and
boys
pastoral,
old

years
not
to
wink
looks,
middle

life
to
chase,
it's
musical

--Louis Zukofsky

Feb 12, 2006

"Oops, Sorry , I thought you were Iran for a second, there."

Further proof that the Keystone KKKops who've abducted this country shouldn't be allowed to handle firearms, let alone invade a sovereign nation. Truth is more moronic than fiction. Good luck with that Exit Strategy, Elmer Fudd.
For Francesca Woodman #12
[New York 1979-1980]

Are a melted fable

taffeta of organs

tricksters their eyes
fall like peppermints

I is for Everyone

F is

Lethe the O

Crystalline egg

the river that licks
the cerebellum clean

are sugar or salt
dirt or dusk

the cells of my blood
are pennies
For Francesca Woodman #11
[Providence, RI, 1975-1978]

DAM MEM
NAT ORI
IO AE

Feb 8, 2006

Mars Needs Women



The submissions I have received thusfar for My Spaceship are extremely skewed toward denizens of the Red Planet. I suppose that's what I get for selecting a source text aimed at preadolescent boys. But still, if you happen to have never been a preadolescent boy and are considering submitting something, I encourage you to do so!

Feb 3, 2006

Had to re-encounter Bishop after about 10 years for a class, the poems and prose. Never having been a fan of the poems, it was interesting to note that I enjoyed the prose a fair amount. Bishop is most effective when she is afforeded the time to develop the emotional weight of the recollections she deals in. By means of explicit description and the rhythm of the narrative, she is able to charge the descriptions with the intimacy she wants to instill the reader. In the poems, she has less space to do this, consequently, the lines must bear too much weight.

What in the prose comes across as tenacious recollection in the poems gives a sense instead of rote nostalgia. The prose feels more "improvisational" than the meticulously wrought poems. The poems feel clinical in their crystalline order. E.g. "Sestina" is artfully constructed--putting forth a seamless narrative in the mold of what is essentially a lyric form--best at announcing its own artifice. Many poets use the sestina to convey the obsessive character of intense recollection--to my mind this is a misapplication of the form as the real character of memory belies the conscious manipulation of a form like the sestina. The narrative quality in "Sestina" is a kind of artifice, but the evident charade seems to run counter to the poet's evident desire to express "the truth as it was."

To my mind, poetry is the messenger of forgetfulness, absolution and the plasticity of the conscious mind and the resulting plasticity of recollection. I do not believe in truth or nostaglia. This seems to run counter to the epic tradition, however, to which poets like Bishop are most closely aligned.

It appears necessary to identify two governing impetuses for poems: those that are primarily narrative (agents of memory) and those that are primarily lyric (agents of forgetting). The Styx and the Lethe. It is perhaps a subjective judgment to state that poetry's most native role is the latter, however. Under close scrutiny the entire dichotomy breaks down--as in the Chinese tradition where there is no prose/poetry duality--merely specific terms for specific kinds of writing with a certain style of representing (or not representing).

In this light, the category of "prose poem" becomes much more broad--referring not only to poems without arbitrary linebreaks, but also to those which represent mimetically like prose does, that tell a story in "realtime"--the elegiac narrative tradition (Silliman's Quietude)--which has become the measure against which verse has been compared for the past 40 years or so, most likely since the New Critics and the Confessionals. (Doctor and Patient).